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Fan Film Friday: ‘Severus Snape and the Marauders’ (Harry Potter)

J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter has been enchanting fans since 1997. Over the course of 11 years, we’ve had 7 full books, 8 feature films, short stories, Pottermore and more (ha)! 2016 has been especially magical, with the opening of the Wizarding World of Harry Potter at Universal Studios Hollywood in April, as well as the highly anticipated theatrical debut of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them  coming November 18th. Add Broad strokes Productions fan film, titled Severus Snape and the Marauders, to the list of marvelous 2016 releases that had us holding our wands up in delight!

The story kicks in with James Potter and his marauder pals Sirius Black, Remus Lupin, and Peter Pettigrew at the pub celebrating their graduation from Hogwarts and pondering about their futures, including the repercussions of possibly fighting against people they went to school with in the pending war. Conflict arises when Potter’s enemy, Severus Snape, walks into the bar.

This is more than the jock vs. the goth kid: Potter and Snape hate each other!

The script, coupled with what fans know from the books, show that these two men had different ideals about the world and how things should be. The only thing they have in common is that they both love Potter’s squeeze, Lily. Potter foolishly attempts to assert his dominance over Snape by “scaring” him a little. Biting words quickly escalate into a full-fledged wand-wielding row, and later, some fighting mano y mano.

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One of the things I always adored about the Harry Potter universe was how Rowling managed to make the impossible seem so possible! Even in a world of magic and mystery, the characters and their problems were still relatable to the core. The same can be said for this project, which contained all the witty dialogue and thoughtful character development that one would expect from Rowling herself. The characters were fleshed out and natural, and each character was cast perfectly both in look and demeanor. I especially loved Zachary David’s comical-without-being-over-the-top portrayal of the spineless wimp Peter Pettigrew.

I was entranced by the major battle scene in the film. It was not just action packed, it was visually stunning (no pun intended)! With a brawl with moves that felt like a dance, a sweeping score that would make John Williams proud, and spells visualized via brilliant sparks of color, I could not have been more impressed.

Beautiful sets, effects, and wardrobes also made me feel enveloped by the story.

Members of Gryffindor, Slytherin, Ravenclaw, and Hufflepuff alike can all agree one one thing: Severus Snape and the Marauders is amazing!

I definitely recommend Severus Snape and the Marauders to you, GeekGirl World! Watch it below:

What did YOU think GeekGirl World? Let us know in the comments section!

Want more Fan Film Friday fun, darling cinephiles? Be sure to check out our other FFF reviews here!

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Book Review: ‘Food Whore’

Food Whore is a deliciously devised debut novel from author Jessica Tom. Tom’s background in the culinary world not only lends a hand but creates a fantastic entrée of intrigue and enchantment. Still, some sections of Food Whore are simply too difficult to digest. Tom’s knowledge of ingredients and the manner in which they blend and tangle with your taste buds will make you wish you had an ounce of the culinary skill of her characters. These intense descriptions of the many delights encountered in the New York City dining landscape may leave the pages of your book damp with your own ardent saliva.

FoodWhore paperback cover - finalLike any fine dining experience this one begins with hors d’oeuvres at a finely set table. Though the tablecloth is silk, the diners are rayon; well-meaning and fine to gaze upon from a distance, but not quite well refined. Tia Monroe is a prodigy with culinary dreams. She will put herself on the plate of culinary legend Helen Lansky and acquire a coveted internship. When her dreams burn on the stove, she is salvaged by feared and powerful New York Times food critic Michael Salz.

The entrée is not au maigre. Michael Salz suffers from a condition of the tongue, aguesia, which prevents him from continuing his journey into the succulent world of foie gras and entrecôte. Impressed by Monroe’s written works, Salz hires her to deceive the culinary world. Working for Salz takes Monroe on a fascinating journey through the sophisticated world she longs to dine in, but quickly learns it isn’t all flambé and macaroons.

No entrée would be complete without its side and this one is starchy. Though Monroe’s personal goals have taken a backseat to the misstep of the professional, she is still determined to create a whipped mashed yam joy. Her tenacity sometimes leads to a lumpy, gluey concoction that only her inner circle can enjoy and only the truest of her inner circle can truly critique to better her skill.

For dessert Tom serves a tarte tatin, warm and gooey with the surprising prospect of emotional response. With this full meal behind, satisfaction is inevitable. You may even need a nap from impending food coma, but for some reason you will crave another helping.

Portrait of author Jessica Tom by Liz Clayman
Portrait of author Jessica Tom by Liz Clayman

Jessica Tom is a writer and food blogger living in Brooklyn. She has worked on initiatives with restaurants, hospitality startups, food trucks, and citywide culinary programs. She graduated from Yale University with a concentration in fiction writing and wrote the restaurant review for the Yale Daily News Magazine. Food Whore is her first novel.


Food Whore

by Jessica Tom

Paperback: 352 pages

Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (October 27, 2015)

Language: English

ISBN-10: 0062387006

ISBN-13: 978-006238700

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Book Review: The Glass Gauntlet by Carter Roy

“I’m not my father’s biggest fan. Not just because he ordered a flunky to kill me the last time I saw him…And not because of his secret identity as the head of the Bend Sinister…All of that is bad enough, but even worse? He stole a person’s soul.”
The Glass GauntletThe Glass Gauntlet picks up where The Blood Guard (Book #1) leaves off. Ronan, Greta, Sammy and Dawkins are dodging the Bend Sinister, finding new places to hide and clever ways to communicate. A piece in a chapter about communicating through an abandoned massively multiplayer online game (MMO) stole my nerdy heart.
Some of the best moments in the book are the attention to detail. Though I don’t care for Dawkins, I do find it amusing that he wore a YOLO T-shirt with the last “O” crossed out. There is a mention of Minecraft, a phenomenon amongst children (and adults), which made me appreciate Roy’s knowledge of his audience.
Unlike the first book of the series, high octane action transpires near the beginning after only minimal exposition. This structural shift is complete when the children, Ronan, Greta and Sammy, are enrolled in a school to test their intelligence. This is where it gets a little boring. The chapters seem to drag on a little bit. Admittedly the results of this school are predictable and throw the kids into a Maze Runner-like situation.
The dialogue and exposition are simple, even for the elementary grade levels. The characters don’t exhibit any development. These characters could actually be the same archetypes from the first few chapters of the first book and Sammy may as well not even have existed. Despite these critiques, the overall story is enjoyable for its target audience. If you or your little ones are looking for something very quick and fun to read, this is that book.

Carter Roy author photo credit JDZ Photography
Carter Roy author photo credit JDZ Photography

Carter Roy lives in Brooklyn, New York with his wife, a spiky cat, and far too many books. Visit www.carterroy.com or follow him on Twitter: @CarterRoyBooks


The Glass Gauntlett
Author: Carter Roy
Age Range: 10 – 14 year
Grade Level: 4th – 8th
Series: The Blood Guard Series (Book 2)
Hardcover: 261 pages
Publisher: Two Lions (August 18, 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1477826262
ISBN-13: 978-1477826263

 

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Harper Lee Proves You’re Are Never Too Old To Publish A Second Great American Novel

Publisher HarperCollins announced that Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Harper Lee, will be publishing her long awaited follow-up to her 1960 perennial novel “To Kill a Mockingbird”. The forthcoming title “Go Set A Watchman,” was actually completed sometime in the 1950s, prior to the publishing of “To Kill a Mockingbird,” however, it is the story of an adult Scout, making it essentially a sequel.

In the mid-1950s, I completed a novel called ‘Go Set a Watchman’. It features the character known as Scout as an adult woman, and I thought it a pretty decent effort. My editor, who was taken by the flashbacks to Scout’s childhood, persuaded me to write a novel (what became ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’) from the point of view of the young Scout.

– Harper Lee via HarperCollins Publishers

The 304-page book is Lee’s first new novel in more than 50 years, and HarperCollins has set the first printing at 2 million copies for its July 14, 2015 street date.

I was a first-time writer, so I did as I was told. I hadn’t realized it (the original book) had survived, so was surprised and delighted when my dear friend and lawyer Tonja Carter discovered it. After much thought and hesitation, I shared it with a handful of people I trust and was pleased to hear that they considered it worthy of publication. I am humbled and amazed that this will now be published after all these years.

– Harper Lee via HarperCollins Publishers

“Go Set A Watchman” takes place 20 years after the events in “To Kill A Mockingbird” in the same familiar backdrop of Maycomb, Alabama.

Scout (Jean Louise Finch) has returned to Maycomb from New York to visit her father, Atticus,” the publisher’s announcement reads. “She is forced to grapple with issues both personal and political as she tries to understand her father’s attitude toward society, and her own feelings about the place where she was born and spent her childhood.

– HarperCollins Press Release

“To Kill a Mockingbird” is one of the definitive great American novels of all time with sales worldwide totaling over 40 million copies. It was awarded the Pulitzer Prize when it was published in 1960, and turned into a major motion picture in 1962. Gregory Peck, in the lead role of Atticus Finch, went on to win the Academy Award for Best Actor for his portrayal.

Harper_Lee_Medal

At 88 years old, Harper Lee provides a shining example that you are never too old to make a sequel. The book is reportedly being published just as it was first written with no revisions, so maybe this just means that your never too old to see the hardwork that you have cherished for so long finally published. As a first-time writer just wanting to get her work out there, Harper Lee accomplished a feat that few ever achieve by making an indelible mark in the literary world. This new book is certain to further extend her legacy as not only a great female writer, but a GREAT WRITER.

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Disney Lends Its Characters To Young Coders Campaign While Barbie Gives Us A Lesson In Her Irrelevance

As part of Computer Science Education Week from December 8-14, Code.org is partnering with Disney on a mission to get kids interested in coding.

With a new tutorial titled “Artist with Anna and Elsa,” young coders will be introduced to practical coding concepts by the most popular characters from the House of Mouse right now.

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Level 6 of the Frozen inspired coding tutorial

Capitalizing on the popularity of the blockbuster Frozen with this tutorial is only the beginning for Code.org, which is in their second year of their “Hour of Code” Campaign. The tutorial will include guest lectures from leading women in tech in an effort to promote computer science industry careers among young girls.

This is a huge departure from Mattel’s stab at reaching young female minds by with their 2010 Random House publication called “Barbie: I Can Be a Computer Engineer.”

In this addition to the series of books that explore Barbie’s endless career choices, we are introduced to a Barbie enthusiastic about designing a game. However, she makes a point of telling Skipper that of course she has to have her guy friends code it for her, because she is only working on the design. Then, there is a subsequent incident where Barbie doesn’t realize she has a virus that has crippled her computer until Skipper offers up the suggestion.

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Barbie implying that girls can’t code and designers are useless in one well placed laughing comment.

Furthering the idea that young girls can do anything, as long as it’s not too technical and doesn’t require logic, this book also reduces the importance of a designer’s role to just making things look pretty. Such a simple task that even an airhead like Barbie (who has been an astronaut, by the way) can do it! Mattel has since apologized and the book has been pulled from Amazon.

Thankfully for the sake of young minds, especially young female minds, Disney’s partnership with Code.org doesn’t stop with this tutorial. The media and entertainment giant has pledged $100,000 to Code.org and will host “Hour of Code” events in the US and Canada.

To check out the tutorial and learn more about Code.org, visit Code.org/frozen

Sources: Geek Wire, Daily Dot, CNet

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