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Comic Review: ‘Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor’ #1

DoctorWho4DCoverAfw.jpg.size-600Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor #1

Synopsis: Victorian England. A mysterious woman commands a hidden army in a house of the blind. Scryclops stalk the streets…. and something alien and terrible screams from prehistory – with a hunger that cannot be satisfied! The Fourth Doctor and Sarah Jane Smith return for an all-new adventure: GAZE OF THE MEDUSA!

Written by: Gordon Rennie, Emma Beeby

Art By: Brian Williamson

Release Date:
March 23, 2016

Publisher: Titan Comics

Release Date: March 23, 2016

Price: $3.99

Summary:

The Fourth Doctor and Sarah Jane are leaving a show when Sarah Jane is suddenly kidnapped by one-eyed aliens, the Denizins. The Doctor was also targeted by the aliens due to the fact that a masked woman knows that he is a time traveler, but he manages to escape their grasp thanks to a young woman named Athena, who saved the Doctor against the judgement of her father. While Sarah Jane is imprisoned, the Doctor learns about the Denizins through Athena and her father, Professor Odysseus James.

Review:

Even if you weren’t born when the Fourth Doctor was on the air (Tom Baker portrayed the Fourth Doctor on BBC’s hit series Doctor Who from 1974-1981 ), Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor #1 will definitely be able to give you an idea of what he was like and what kind of adventures he had!

Gordon Rennie and Emma Beeby kept their characters true to the Doctor Who story, which I found to be really comforting. I love when famous characters are written well and accurately, and the writers really succeeded with this comic issue. I love Sarah Jane as a character, so to see her included in this story was an amazing feeling. She definitely was awesome when she was with the Tenth Doctor.

Brian Williamson’s art style is absolutely amazing in this issue, which is a huge relief because Doctor Who comic art is either beautiful or absolutely off base. This is not the case with this particular issue, which is a huge relief because I’ve encountered many comics that were unreadable due to their atrocious art.

In all, I really enjoyed this story and I can’t wait for the next comic to be released!

 

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Comic Review: ‘Rivers of London’ Volume 2, Issue #1

Rivers of London Volume 2, Issue #1

RoL_Nightwith_Cover_C - Lee SullivanSynopsis: A police vehicle on a routine prison transfer in north London is stormed by Russian hoodlums seeking to free a very particular prisoner. Their target is a witch. A very powerful witch who doesn’t want to be free. Things rapidly turn very ugly for the hoods and it’s soon a job for full-time police constable and part-time wizard, Peter Grant.

Release Date: March 16, 2016

Released by: Titan Comics

Price: $3.55

Review:

I wasn’t aware that this was the second volume of this series when I picked up this comic, so I was rightfully confused when reading it.

The writer included little background information about the characters and story, which is fine for folks who are already engaged in the story. But for someone like me who just picked up this series, that little background information would have helped me understand the story and be engaged with it.

From what I could gather, this issue seems to center around a secret witch organization which the Russian mob wants something to do with.

This comic definitely is deep in Russian history and roots. The characters speak Russian in the first few pages, which made me very confused and worried that I was given the wrong comic. I don’t really know anything about Russian history, but now thanks to this comic I do have somewhat of an understanding of what the economic climate in Russia is and how Vladimir Putin rose to power.

But that is pretty much all I was able to pick up from this comic issue.

Based on what I read so far, I do think Rivers of London is an interesting concept, but I would have to read all the prior issues to get a better understanding of the story.

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Comic Review: ’21st Century Tank Girl’ #3

21st_Century_Tank_Girl#321st Century Tank Girl is back in issue #3. Like issue 1 and issue 2, #3 is a cornucopia of stories, posters, and quotes, each overflowing with an abundance of adventure and chaos for our favorite Australian renegade and her pals.

The issue begins when hungover party-goers go on a heist for God’s tighty whities (seriously). The story ran a bit long for my liking, but random drawings in the margins (including charicature cameos by Andy Warhol, a setient hamburger, and Cheech Marin) kept my interest when the somewhat predictable story could not. With a character as wacky as Tank Girl, I was surprised and somewhat disappointed that this story had so many “spy movie” tropes. I hope they were just paying homage and poking fun at the hokey genre, because otherwise there is no excuse for being cliche.

Other stories included a local Ma and Pa shop has been taken over by BALL-MART, a “cereal-ously” ridiculous problem when Booga trades in the group’s life savings to invest in Super-Krunchy Booga Flakes, and an Evel Knievel-esque stunt beautifully crafted to look like something straight out of the Sunday funnies.

While 21st Century Tank Girl #3 had some hits and misses, I still had fun reading the issue. I do recommend that you pick up a copy of the comic in stores, as it comes with a poster. Also, there were a few stand-alone pages with gorgeous art and inspiring quotes that were so empowering they deserve to be framed and hung!

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21st Century Tank Girl #3
WRITER: Alan Martin
ARTIST: Jamie Hewlett, Warwick Johnson-Caldwell, Phillip Bond, Jonathan Edwards, Brett Parson
COVER: Brett Parson
PUBLISHER: Titan Comics
PAGECOUNT: 32
COVER PRICE: $3.99
RELEASE DATE: August 12

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Comic Review: ‘Surface Tension #3’

Surface Tension #3 (the midway point in a 5-part ecological horror miniseries written/illustrated by Jay Gunn and distributed by Titan Comics) was released, and despite receiving a handy dandy electronic copy for my reviewing pleasure, I skipped over to my local comic book shop to pick up a hard copy. PDFs simply can’t compete with the vibrancy of ink on glossy pages or the crispness of leafing through a brand spanking new comic book. As I was purchasing the issue, the clerks asked what I thought of the series so far. “Weird, huh?” they quipped.

Surface-Tension_03_CoverYes, with premonitions of devastating tsunamis caused by eerie coral, frightening creatures (like a Creepy Fly Baby) attacking islanders, hypnosis sequences with lovely sherbet-colored panels, and fantastical transformations complete with new-found special powers like water juggling, Surface Tension #3 is definitely strange— but that’s not a bad thing. Actually, in a day and age when remakes are all the rage and everything is one giant recycled cliché, I’m more than okay with a little weirdness. (In fact, we even posted a blog about the 4 things we loved about the series after issue #1!)

As a good story teller should at the midway point, Gunn ups the ante, teasing readers by answering some questions while simultaneously introducing new mysteries. After perusing #2, we posted a blog about the 4 questions we had about the series thus far, and I am pretty sure I was 99.9% wrong on all my speculations. As someone who has a solid track record of predicting the ending of a movie from the trailer, I have to admit I’m thoroughly enjoying the surprises in Surface Tension. Not knowing what weird thing is going to happen next is precisely what keeps me reading the series!

SURFACE TENSION #3 (OF 5)
WRITER/ARTIST: Jay Gunn
PUBLISHER: Titan Comics
PAGE-COUNT: 32PP
PRICE: $3.99
ON SALE: July 29

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Comic Review: ‘The Blacklist: The Gambler’ – Part 1

TITAN COMICS

THE BLACKLIST: The Gambler – Part 1
Writer: Nicole Phillips
Artist: Beni Lobel
Publisher: Titan Comics
Page-count: 32pp
Price: $3.99
Release Date: July 22, 2015


There is only one meme that could sum up my excitement for when I heard there was going to be a Blacklist comic:

Is there an emoticon for *grabby hands*? Because I could use that too.

This just in, apparently there are several. 

I’m a huge fan of the NBC television show and a huge fan of comic books in general. So when I found out there was a Blacklist comic, I did a little wiggle dance and squeed “they put chocolate in my peanut butter!” I was not disappointed, and I neither will you be.

TITAN COMICS

The dangerous world of Raymond Red Reddington and Agent Elizabeth Keen translates extremely well to comic book format. Written by show script writer Nicole Phillips, the story thus far is solid and as good as anything you’d get on television. And the artwork by Beni Lobel is spot on, bringing not just the characters to life but their style and attitudes as well. The art compliments the dialogue perfectly. If you’re familiar with the show, you will absolutely read the text in the character’s voices.

Much like the show’s episodes, this issue focuses on one of the 161 “blacklisters” who make up Red’s collection of killers, thieves, and assorted crime bosses who, along with the FBI, Red wants to bring to justice (of course, Red’s justice might be an ironic taste of their own bitter medicine).
Number 148, Leon Kiklinski, is Red and Agents Keen and Ressler’s focus. A modern terrorist-for-hire who specializes in the manipulation of media, Kiklinski has made the FBI the scapegoat in a gruesome police shooting of a community activist in front of a crowd of live witnesses and hundreds of rolling video cameras and cell phones. While the FBI deals with the social media fallout and the serious blow to morale due to being framed for an innocent man’s public execution, Liz and Ressler embark on a deadly wild goose chase perpetrated by Kiklinski and whoever he’s working for. The ending ramps up to the next issue so perfectly that I feel like the next page should be a commercial for The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon.

TITAN COMICS

It’s important to note that this story occurs after the conclusion of the Berlin storyline, but before the end of Season 2, so while it’s not set in an exact point in time, it does take place

TITAN COMICSafter Red and Lizzy have gotten to know each other (as much as Red will allow), so their chemistry is very enjoyable. Mr. Kaplan also makes an appearance with Red that implies that Red has become acutely aware of his own mortality in the wake of the death of an old associate.

One should also be warned that this story doesn’t pull any punches just because it’s in comic book form.

Titan Comics rates it at 15+. The graphic violence that is prevalent on the show is expressed realistically, though not wantonly, on the page, and fans who enjoy the show regularly should have no problem digesting this issue. This series is the perfect cure for those suffering through the Summer break until the show returns on Thursday, September 24.

Included is a copy of Red’s infamous blacklist and a 2015 San Diego Comic-Con exclusive promotional artwork page. The Blacklist: The Gambler is on sale today, July 22, and retails for $3.99.

What do you think of Red and Liz’s comic book counterparts? Will you be picking up a copy? Tell us in the comments below!

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Comic Review: ‘Death Sentence: London’ # 2

Death Sentence: London #2 
WRITER: Montynero
ARTIST: Martin Simmonds
COVERS BY: Montynero, Martin Simmonds
PUBLISHER: Titan Comics
PAGECOUNT: 32
COVER PRICE: $3.99
RELEASE DATE: 08 July

Review:
Super powers, corrupt government, and a population that is hated and feared, sound familiar? Let’s be honest, it’s hard to write a graphic novel about super powers that doesn’t sound like some of the most popular MARVEL books around. When I first heard about Death Sentence I was not excited to read it. I put off reading the first issue for almost a month and when I heard the second issue was slated for release I procrastinated reading that as well. I planned on writing a simple review, a two word sentence, “See X-Men.” Then, with both issues sitting in front of me, I jumped in head first, and man was I wrong.

A British book with witty dialogue and clever storytelling, the first issue of Death Sentence was wildly entertaining. G-Plus, a superpower-causing STD, is spreading wildly in London. The infected experience extra-normal abilities never before seen. With no cure, the infected die within six months from the point of affliction, but not before experiencing depression and extreme mood swings. Protagonists Weasel and Verity must work together to not only stop a crazed terrorist, but also protect the innocent.

By the second issue, the hunt for the G-Plus infected populous is in full effect as the Federal Bureau of Investigation begins to infiltrate make-shift safe houses on American soil. As each unit does their best to take out the infected persons, we are introduced to a new protagonist, Jeb Mulgrew. Though Jeb doesn’t realize it, his own government may be the cause of the G-Plus virus and the resulting rise in England’s violent crimes.

While Montynero lets loose a story from the imagination, Martin Simmonds reels it in with magnificent artwork. Every frame serves a real purpose, nothing remains static and the shading is marvelous. Without a true background in art all I can say is that each action sequence was highly eye-catching, even without explosions or high octane drama.

The world of Death Sentence does not look like a great place to be. Superpowers come with a high cost and each world power is doing what they seem to do best in graphic novels: eradicate. If you’re looking for a great story and fun visuals then this is the book you need to purchase. I can’t wait to pick up issue three of the best thing to come out of England since Americans!

 

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Review – Doctor Who: The Eleventh Doctor #14

DOCTOR WHO: THE ELEVENTH DOCTOR #14
WRITER: Al Ewing, Rob Williams
ARTIST: Simon Fraser
PUBLISHER:  Titan Comics
PAGECOUNT: 32
COVER PRICE:  $3.99
RELEASE DATE: Wednesday, July 8, 2015


I can’t lie… the Eleventh Doctor has been my least favorite Doctor to date.

People tell me it’s because I miss David Tennant, but I know it’s because Eleven irritates me. He’s like a small child who bounces around the grocery store picking everything up, putting nothing back, and the whole time you’re screaming in your head “where are your parents!?” So this issue was particularly nerve-wracking for me because the Doctor finally has to deal with the harsh consequences of his behavior, but all he does is squirm away and whine about how unfair it is that he’s being held accountable.

By the end of the previous issue, the Doctor had defeated the Entity, but lost Jones, his eccentric musical companion. Jones, believing himself dead, floats through space signing amongst the stardust.

Screenshot 2015-07-09 at 8.54.04 AMMeanwhile, in Ancient Rome, the Doctor sits with Alice, rejected by the TARDIS. The Doctor realizes the TARDIS has been warning him for a while, and he pleads with the phone box not to spurn him. As he admits his arrogance and mistakes that he’s made over the years, the TARDIS remains significantly silent. The Doctor changes tactics and insists he could save lives again if the TARDIS would only let him. When he’s met with the same deafening silence, he snaps and demands to be let in immediately!

If the TARDIS wasScreenshot 2015-07-09 at 8.58.40 AM capable of giving the finger to the Doctor, then that’s totally what happens next.  The box lets out some signature VWOORRRPs and begins to fade as the Doctor begs it not to leave him.

With the departure of the TARDIS, the Doctor begins to have an identity crisis. He warns Alice that, in the wrong hands, the TARDIS is a weapon that can rewrite time and destroy space. It’s programed to return to Gallifrey, or to the nearest Time Lord. But since neither of those things exist any longer, the Doctor has no idea where the TARDIS has gone.

The odds are not in the Doctor’s favor, but with the combined efforts of Alice, Jones, and A.R.C., all may not be lost. But the story is not the Homeward Bound homage it sets itself up to be. Improbable odds and an impossible ending await you in this latest adventure of the Doctor!

A ridiculous-but-probably-accurate two-page humor strip by Mark Ellerby features the Doctor, River, and the pros and cons of social media!

Doctor Who: The Eleventh Doctor #14 “The Comfort of the Good – Part 1” is in stores now.  It retails for $3.99.

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Comic Review: 21st Century Tank Girl #2

21st_TG_2_preview1Last month we celebrated the return of rough and tough Tank Girl in the first issue of her new series, 21st Century Tank Girl. This month she’s back in a new set of wild and crazy adventures, including a Mad Max-esque classic car delivery scheme gone bad (with more than one Roger Moore reference), a silly and overly literal military “how to” guide, a “journey to the centre of the tank” filled with 1970s starlets and explosive surprises, and a piece that is summed up perfectly by its title: “You’re young now, but you won’t be for long.”

21st_TG_2_preview3What I love about Tank Girl is that while Alan Martin consistently guides the stories, each vignette is illustrated by various different artists (including Jamie Hewlett, Warwick Johnson-Caldwell, Phillip Bond, Jonathan Edwards, and Brett Parson). This constant shift in art style keeps the stories fresh, fun and interesting –  just like Tank Girl.

While I enjoyed all of the art in the issue, I especially loved Edwards’ work in “Journey to the Centre of the Tank,” which was filled with thick, angular lines and interesting point-of-view shots that perfectly complimented the strange twists in the story.

I feel like every time I’ve read and reviewed a 21st Century Tank Girl issue, I have to make some sort of disclaimer: Tank Girl is not for everyone. It’s just not. However, it doesn’t try to be.

The cover (which is brazenly illustrated by Parson) features a pin-up style shower scene of three punk rocker chicks in a shower. It doesn’t hold back, it doesn’t sugar coat anything, it doesn’t pretend. It’s not fake.

But even though it’s not for everyone, maybe it should be. I believe that everyone can learn a thing or two from Martin and Tank Girl about how to be honest and authentic.

Want to see what Tank Girl is up to next? Stay tuned for issue #3, on sale August 2015 through Titan Comics!

21st Century Tank Girl #2
STORY BY: Alan Martin
ART BY: Jamie Hewlett, Warwick Johnson-Caldwell, Phillip Bond, Jonathan Edwards, Brett Parson
PUBLISHER: Titan Comics
PAGE COUNT: 32
COVER PRICE: $3.99
RELEASE DATE: July 8

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Comic Review: Surface Tension #2 by Jay Gunn

Surface Tension #2 (the second issue in a five-part sci-fi/horror/adventure mini-series created by Jay Gunn and published by Titan Comics) debuted recently, and rather than doing a standard ol’ review, we thought we’d get down to the nitty gritty and address the four questions readers are asking themselves after reading the issue. (Ahoy! Minor spoilers ahead!)

Who is Mystery Memory Man?

Surface-Tension_02_Cover_ALast issue, readers were introduced to Megumi, one of two people who suddenly returned from the sea after coming down with the mysterious “sea sickness” which drove people to the ocean in waves, quite literally. When she resurfaced, she had blue skin and no recollection of what happened.

In this issue, her memories start to come back, including one of her as a child in a hospital following a disaster at a chemical plant. In what was reminiscent of a scene from Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, a new, seemingly masked visitor now appears in her memories. Henceforth known as Mystery Memory Man (MMM)*, the stranger warns Meg that her memories are being used against her and ominously states that “everything is connected” before disappearing.

Who is MMM? How is he able to contact Meg through her mind? It seems like he’s trying to help her, but why? He promises they’ll meet again, leaving readers in suspense and yearning to learn more about him and his intentions.

*Truthfully, we don’t even know if it’s a man. Heck, we don’t even know if it’s HUMAN. But for all intents and purposes, we’ll stick with MMM.

What is up with that sea monster?

Issue #2 upped the scare factor by showcasing a gnarly creature that surfaced from the water and crept onto land, blurting out strange, robot-esque phrases like “the flesh needs to be reconnected” and “evolve new flesh.” Visually, he’s frightening with his glowing red eyes and rows of teeth – definitely the thing of nightmares. The sea monster appears to be on a hunt, possibly for Meg and Ryan, and is willing to kill anything in its way. But what is it? Can it change its form? What does it want? All questions I pondered as I read in horror. I predict a game of cat-and-mouse in the issues to follow.

Who is worse: man or the monsters?

Surface_Tension_2_preview2A memory of a disaster at a chemical plant. Humans attacking others out of fear. Armed guards and threats of violence. Fish returning to the water near where the mysterious coral and monsters appear. All of these things are sprinkled throughout the issue, suggesting that while humans are destroying the planet with waste and cruelty, the mysterious coral (and corresponding monsters) might actually be helping the planet. Perhaps the “monsters” aren’t really terrible at all, but rather see mankind as a threat to Earth and are just trying to protect the world?

Sure, 99% of the human population has to go, but isn’t that a small price to pay to preserve an entire planet? While I’m not entirely sure that’s the direction the story will go, I do feel like it has potential to bring up deep issues about mankind, our existence on this planet, and the kind of legacy we’ll leave when we (inevitably) become an endangered species – or worse, go extinct. Worth noting: Surface Tension has been heavily promoted as an “eco-thriller,” but the emphasis on the environment is approached in an interesting way that’s understandable without being off-putting to conservatives/global warming deniers/my dad.

WHAT DOES “EVERYTHING IS CONNECTED” MEAN?!

What. Does. It. Mean? This phrase was used in Issue #1 and again in the second and seems to be the major theme of the series, though its significance and meaning isn’t quite clear yet. Is mankind connected to the monsters? Are mankind and the monsters one and the same? What are your predictions, GeekGirl World?

It seems like the first two issues of the series are full of questions, and I can’t wait to read the second half of the series to learn more. Be sure to pick up Surface Tension #2, available at your favorite comic book store now! You can even purchase a hard copy or a digital copy online!

SURFACE TENSION #2
WRITER/ARTIST: Jay Gunn
PUBLISHER: Titan Comics
ISSUES IN SERIES: 2 (OF 5)
PAGE-COUNT: 32 pp
PRICE: $3.99
RELEASE DATE: June 24

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Comic Review: The Light and Darkness War

Light 3Tom Veitch (Elseworlds, Tales of the Jedi, Star Wars Dark Empire) and Cam Kennedy (Boba Fett, Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D., Punisher, Star Wars Dark Empire) join forces in one of their most captivating team-ups. The Light and Darkness War, originally printed in 1989, centers around Vietnam Veteran Lazarus Jones. Jones lost his legs in Vietnam in a helicopter explosion that killed four of his brothers-in-arms and closest friends. Within the first few pages it’s revealed that Jones is suffering from PTSD and wishes he had died with his friends. He is leaning on alcohol and drugs to handle his grief.

After visiting the Vietnam Memorial with his devoted wife, Jones is involved in a car accident that leaves him in a coma. While his body lays still in a hospital bed, his spirit starts to drift through a vague and abstract space. Everything begins to come together again and Jones finds himself in an unfamiliar place, with his legs intact.

As immediately as Jones is transcended into this strange place, he finds himself confronted with another oddity, his brothers-at-arms gathered together on a single ship. As the shock wears off, his friends inform him of the war at hand. The battle between light and darkness is all consuming in this new dimension. It’s a war that consumes their allies, turns an otherwise beautiful dimension to a bloody battlefront; it’s a war that never ends.

This book serves as an extended metaphor for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. The actual war has been over for more than a decade but for the soldiers it still lives on. Jones leaves half of himself in the world as we know it while surrendering his other half to a place where reality is suspended and he can be with his friends, a soldier once more. He retreats further into himself, giving into the conflict and turmoil. This discord between light and darkness may not be an ideal place to stay but it’s a familiar one; a place Jones can deal with, free of guilt or unpleasant memories.

Light 1Light 2This unpleasant dimension is artfully crafted by writer and artist alike. Tom Veitch delves into era specific language to help create a dimension cemented between the late 1960s and early 1970s. Every line sounds authentic as peppered by the occasional slang; waxin’, waste ya’, or dig it. Cam Kennedy adds to the authenticity with art reminiscent of a Joe Kubert style, not rich in color but great depth in shading. Every panel wordlessly reminds that the dimension is desolate of peace and traditional happiness. Kennedy’s costume and character design remains strictly of the Vietnam era even when incorporating extra-dimensional beings. The design seamlessly creates a past era while the slight contrast jarringly places the reader in a different dimension.

Not only is this a great read, with great social context, it’s magnificently eye-catching without being drawn in an over dramatic style. Though this is a reprint over 20 years past its original publication, it still stands up to criticism. It’s a classic that deserves respect and a place on every person’s bookshelf.

THE LIGHT AND DARKNESS WAR
WRITER: Tom Veitch
ARTISTS: Cam Kennedy
FORMAT: 208 pages, HC, FC,
PUBLISHER: Titan Comics
PRICE: $24.99/ $27.95 CAN/ £17.99 UK
ISBN: 9781782761808
​COMIC STORE ​RELEASE DATE: May 27
BOOK STORE ​RELEASE DATE: ​June​ 2​3​

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